The international symbol of access or the wheelchair symbol (♿) was designed by Susanne Koefoed in 1968 and revealed to the world at a design conference in Dublin the following year. The motivation behind the design was to generate a renewed awareness of differently-abled people, which coincided with the social movements of the late 1960s. The ISA is now one of the most recognisable symbols in history, as widely used as currency signs and religious motifs.
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Earlier this year, I demonstrated a simple prototype that changed a static element to stick to the browser on scroll. The stakeholders I presented to weren’t familiar with sticky positioning but were excited by how we could increase the visibility of the element. “What else can we stick to the screen on scroll?” they asked. This wasn’t the response I was hoping for.
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Working in a corporate IT infrastructure can be hard when your rights to install new software are limited or require a chain of approvals. I totally understand the need to limit administrator rights on a network full of sensitive information but restrictions like this force designers to create their own work environments so they don’t need to beg IT gatekeepers to install software.
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The original Myspace was like the wild west of social networking. There were few rules when it came to managing your profile design and the site had a pioneering spirit, allowing users to post anything they wanted. Myspace was a great tool to stay in touch with friends but it also became a training ground for me to learn the basics of front end design and coding.
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As an Australian, you can’t escape colloquial language. Whether you have ‘no worries’ or ‘heaps’ of worries that make you ‘mad as a cut snake’, some of our slang phrases can be difficult to decipher for non-Australians. As conversational interfaces become common aspects of UX, designers will have to be conscious of communication barriers caused by cultural identity or risk alienating users.
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I recently had the unfortunate task of replacing another modem-router. I set aside a few hours one morning as I knew I’d inevitably need to call my ISP to clarify my basic home setup. Low and behold, I was back online in under an hour but following the setup wizard interface didn’t come without the usual headaches.
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I wrote a post a few months ago about how homogeneous design patterns are a sign of maturity but I want to flip that argument by highlighting how persuasive and effective intentionally ‘bad’ or ‘ugly’ design can be.
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Three months using Hotjar

Posted 4 years ago

I’ve been using Hotjar for three months now and I’ve barely scratched the surface of how powerful it is. I’ve used Google In-Page Analytics and Crazy Egg to record visitors in other projects and these tools are great but the features included in just the free Hotjar subscription are incredible.
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Remote and flexible work is becoming increasingly normal in digital industries, however surprisingly few employers in the Queensland market actually offer it as a perk. Countless studies prove that employees with work-from-home benefits are generally more productive, happier and less likely to job jump. Why is QLD so far behind the curve?
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A few months ago, I wrote about the new Coles online supermarket experience and how it compared with the Woolworths platform. My biggest gripe was how both retail giants bombarded users with promo content. As an exercise to learn how Chrome extensions were developed one Sunday afternoon, I created Supermarket AdBlocker.
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